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What to Eat in Arunachal Pradesh
Apang or rice beer made from fermented rice or millet is a popular beverage in Arunachal Pradesh.
1. Gulab Jamun
These are small balls which are prepared from Mava and then wrapped in wheat flour to be fried in pure ghee. Once the balls turn golden brown, they are ready to be dropped in sugar syrup for added taste.
2. Bhajji
Bhajji or bhaji is a spicy Indian snack similar to pakora or potato fritters, with several variants. It is usually used as a topping on various Indian meals but has become popular to eat alone as a nack.[citation needed] It is a popular street food in Maharashtra, India and can be found for sale in streetside stalls, especially in dhabas on highways.Apart from being a must in the traditional Maharashtrian Hindu meal on festivals and the like, bhajjis top the comfort food list when it comes to monsoons and rains. They are generally served with a piping hot cup of coffee, tea or a traditional serving of Yameen.
3. Green bean
Green beans, also known as string bean, snap bean in the northeastern and western United States, or ejotes in Mexico, are the unripe fruit of various cultivars of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris). Green bean cultivars have been selected especially for the fleshiness, flavor, or sweetness of their pods.
4. Buttermilk
Buttermilk refers to a number of dairy drinks. Originally, buttermilk was the liquid left behind after churning butter out of cream. This type of buttermilk is known as traditional buttermilk.The term buttermilk also refers to a range of fermented milk drinks, common in warm climates (e.g., the Balkans, the Middle East, Turkey, Afghanistan, Pakistan, India, Sri Lanka and the Southern United States) where unrefrigerated fresh milk sours quickly, as well as in colder climates, such as Scandinavia, Finland, Netherlands, Germany, Poland, Slovakia and Czech Republic. This fermented dairy product known as cultured buttermilk is produced from cows milk and has a characteristically sour taste caused by lactic acid bacteria. This variant is made using one of two species of bacteria
5. Dal
Dal or pappu or paripu is a dried pulse (lentil, pea or various types of bean) which has been split. The outer hull is usually stripped off; dal that has not been hulled is described as chilka (skin), e.g. chilka urad dal, mung dal chilka. The word dal is also used to name the thick stew prepared from these pulses, an important part of Indian, Nepali, Pakistani, Sri Lankan, West Indian and Bangladeshi cuisine. It is regularly eaten with rice in southern India, and with both rice and roti (wheatbased flat bread) throughout northern India and Pakistan as well as Bangladesh, East India, and Nepal where Dal Baht (literally: dal and rice) is the staple food for much of the population. Dal is a ready source of proteins for a balanced diet containing little or no meat. Sri Lankan cooking of dal resembles that of southern Indian dishes.


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